Richard Hutten designs combined conference and ping pong table

Dutch designer Richard Hutten has created a conference table that can easily be converted for a game of ping pong. It features a drawer in each end to contain the two white bats, balls and a detachable net that clamps onto the edges of the table top.

The table is made of beech and features a walnut inlay to mark out the field for table tennis, but also divides the surface into four workspaces. It’s made by craftsmen in the Netherlands and measures 240 by 120 centimetres.

via. Dezeen

Neri&Hu Furniture for De La Espada

Chinese design studio Neri&Hu will present a collection of wooden furniture for De La Espada in New York later this month.

Neri&Hu took the typology of a Chinese Tang Dynasty opium bed and modified it to create a sofa, which has shelves under the deep arms for storage.

The oval Solo table sits on two sets of three legs, each arranged in a triangle.

A two-tier desk folds out into a vanity table, with a mirror in the top shelf and a drawer full of different sized compartments in the lower bottom shelf.

via. Dezeen

Doodle-able Table

The Matchbox table was named for its unique resemblance to an old-school matchbox created by its contrasting materials. It merges playfulness with modern elegance in an occasional table you can write on.

On one end, raw wood makes a clean surface for placing objects, and on the other is a chalkboard surface for drawing, scribbling ideas, or creating your own unique designs!

via. Yankodesign

Animal Music / Nidolab

These are the offices of Animal Music, a music recording studio. Our main idea for this project was to depurate and clean the chaotic space of the common areas. We created a new space that contains a very long high table where different activities could evolve. This was the main intervention done where visitors are welcome to sit or browse though the floor to ceiling bookcase while waiting for a meeting.

Read the original post @ archdaily

Atelier Haußmann : Selected Works

Rough, industrial-like, almost austere. Here is a selection of awesomely-scenographed furniture from the young Berlin-based design label Atelier Haußmann.

« More and more products appear on the market every day. Fashions and trends come and go. We don’t follow any fashions. Less is more. We try to do as little as possible when we work on our product design. It’s up to the product itself – its desire to be a bed, a hook or a table. We give it room to evolve, add some colour, perhaps another screw and tenderly care for it all the way to its final destination » – Atelier Haußmann.

Read the original post @ flodeau